Fishing Reel Repair | Reel Repair | Fishing Reel Repair Company

Kentucky Reel Repair

The Fishing Reel Repair Company has been servicing reels for over 11 years we service every brand and can tune just about any reel made today! We stock most of the common parts. Fishing Reel Repair, Reel Cleaning, and Reel Tuning from The Reel Repair Company. We service for Shimano, Lews, Daiwa, Abu Garcia, and other reels.

Let Us Fix Your Fishing Reels!

PROMPT AND CUSTOMER FRIENDLY SERVICE

Professional Fishing Reel Repair from Fishing Reel Repair Company. The leader in fishing reel repair and fishing reel service specializing in repair and tuning for Shimano, Daiwa, and Abu Garcia reels. We are the premier source for upgrading reels and super-tuning for optimum performance. We stock parts for quick turn around. We are Shimano reel specialists. For domestic Japan reels, please call.

The Fishing Reel Repair Company offers professional, high-quality fishing reel repair services.

We have years of experience servicing all makes and models of fresh and saltwater fishing reels, including baitcasting reels, spinning reels, and conventional saltwater reels.

Fishing reels can be very complex depending on the make and model. Professional reel cleaning and yearly maintenance are highly recommended. Fishing reels should be disassembled, cleaned, and lubed every year. Regular cleaning and maintenance can extend the life of your fishing reel and bring it back to top performance.

shimano reel repair

We know Shimano! Shimano Models are highly prized for their reliability, strength and smoothness. A longtime benchmark round reel for cranking and known for their durability, Shimano’s reels continue to be a favorite with anglers looking to fish the best. We know what makes a low profile high end casting reel work.Trust us to completely disassemble each reel, clean it thoroughly, inspect all parts, replace worn parts, & lubricate correctly. It sounds like a lot of work, that’s why we do it right the first time. Don’t hesitate,we know the tricks!

We know Abu Garcia! Abu Garcia Models are highly prized for their reliability, strength and smoothness. A longtime benchmark round reel for cranking and known for their durability, Abu Garcia’s reels continue to be a favorite with anglers looking to fish the best. We know what makes a low profile high end casting reel work. Trust us to completely disassemble each reel, clean it thoroughly, inspect all parts, replace worn parts, & lubricate correctly. It sounds like a lot of work, that’s why we do it right the first time. Don’t hesitate,we know the tricks!

Kentucky Reel Repair
Kentucky Reel Repair

We know Daiwa! Daiwa Models are highly prized for their reliability, strength and smoothness. A longtime benchmark round reel for cranking and known for their durability, Daiwa’s reels continue to be a favorite with anglers looking to fish the best. We know what makes a low profile high end casting reel work. Trust us to completely disassemble each reel, clean it thoroughly, inspect all parts, replace worn parts, & lubricate correctly. It sounds like a lot of work, that’s why we do it right the first time. Don’t hesitate,we know the tricks!

We know Lews! Lews Models are highly prized for their reliability, strength and smoothness. A longtime benchmark round reel for cranking and known for their durability, Abu Garcia’s reels continue to be a favorite with anglers looking to fish the best. We know what makes a low profile high end casting reel work. Trust us to completely disassemble each reel, clean it thoroughly, inspect all parts, replace worn parts, & lubricate correctly. It sounds like a lot of work, that’s why we do it right the first time. Don’t hesitate,we know the tricks!

Kentucky Reel Repair
Kentucky Reel Repair

We service freshwater and saltwater reels! All reels are completely dissembled, down to the smallest washer. Nothing is left intact. Metal parts go into an ultrasonic cleaner and all other parts are scrubbed by hand. Bearings are completely disassembled (shields removed), flushed out, degreased, placed in the ultrasonic cleaner, and tested on a bearing checker. Metal drag washers, pinion gear, main gears, and main drive shaft are cleaned and all corrosion removed. Drag washers scrubbed, degreased and a touch of Cal’s Drag Grease added. 

If needed, or requested, factory bearings replaced with new high-speed bearings and drag washers upgraded to Carbontex drag washers. The cost is only for upgraded parts and shipping.

We can replace the plastic bushings on your drive gears, drive shafts and spools with stainless steel bearings or ceramic bearings. A small investment for lasting performance. This will keep the gears in alignment, eliminate excessive tolerance and reduce wear. We stock over 50 sizes of bearings to meet your needs. We only sell high quality bearings. No cheap substitutes. Boca Orange seal ceramic bearings in stock.

Kentucky Reel Repair

TURNAROUND TIME FOR REEL REPAIRS:

All repairs will be done as quickly and efficiently as possible, but we do take extra time for cleaning, maintenance, and making sure your reel is restored as close to or exceed factory specifications. We are NOT a production line. We take great care in servicing your reel and we intend to do it right the first time. That said, if you have an immediate need for your reel such as an upcoming tournament, let us know and we will try our best, within reason, to accommodate you.

We are accumulating a large parts inventory, but due to the vast number of fresh and saltwater spinning, baitcasting, and conventional reels on the market, we may or may not have your exact part at the time of service. These parts will be ordered as quickly as possible to get you fishing.

Our Promise to You:

Personalized service, quick turnaround and no surprises.  No fishing reel repairs are completed without customer approval and we guarantee a quick return on all fishing reels that we repair or service. In other words, we treat others the way we like to be treated and we pride ourselves on our workmanship.

The Fishing Reel Repair Company provides quality fishing reel repair service and replacement parts. We go to great lengths to get your reel back in prime condition. No matter what type of reel you send us, we pride ourselves on the care we give your reels. Many years experience has made The Fishing Reel Repair Company a business worth working with. We have built a reputation as a quality and professional fishing reel repair business.

We take pride in fishing reel repairs and service. Have questions let us know. We return all questions as soon as possible.

Kentucky Reel Repair
Kentucky Reel Repair

You Can Trust Our Quality:

Quality fishing reel repair and service is what we do.

There is only one way to properly service and repair your fishing reel – completely break it down, thoroughly clean and inspect every single part, and put the fishing reel back together again using the highest quality lubricants and OEM parts.

As we clean every part of your reel by hand and ultrasonicly we inspect them for wear and defects. If repair cost appear to be getting out of line you will be contacted with an estimate, and you will be able to make the call whether to continue with service.

Here at Fishing Reel Repair Company we do not want any surprises for our customers and we try our best to achieve that

Kentucky Reel Repair
Kentucky Reel Repair
Kentucky Reel Repair
Kentucky Reel Repair

WE MEET THE NEEDS OF SERIOUS FISHERMEN AND THEIR REELS

REELS TODAY ARE FAR SUPERIOR WITH THE ADVENT OF CNC MACHINERY AND LIGHTWEIGHT METALS. DISASSEMBLING, CLEANING, AND REPAIRING YOUR VERY EXPENSIVE INVESTMENT IS NO PROBLEM FOR US. ASSEMBLING THEM BACK TOGETHER IS A BREEZE!

FAQ

Most frequent questions and answers

Prices range from $19.99 to $39.99 depending on reel type. This covers cleaning and lubricating of the reel as well as performance diagnostic check. Any additional parts or upgrades will be extra. Estimated time that the service will take will be approximately 2-4 weeks.

  1. Take the reel apart. You can use masking tape to number each part so it will be easier to reassemble later. Use tweezers for handling wire clips and springs. Remove the line from the spool.
  2. Strip or tape the line. Either strip the fishing line from the spool or secure it with masking tape before removing the spool. The line will get caught between the spool and the frame if you skip this step.
  3. Rinse. Rinse the entire reel with clean water before you begin cleaning the spool.
  4. Apply Simple Green Marine All-Purpose Boat Cleaner.
  5. Use a toothbrush or small paintbrush to scrub.
  6. Make sure to rinse all the cleaner. Thoroughly rinse with running water after cleaning.
  7. Thoroughly dry to prevent rust. You can first dry with a soft cloth, then use a blow dryer to ensure there is no moisture left behind.
  8. Apply grease and oil. You can use WD40. Apply a light coating of grease on the gears using a toothpick or small brush, then do the same with a couple of drops of oil on the ball bearings. Lubrication prevents corrosion.
  9. Reassemble. Use the number system you laid out in the beginning to put your reel back together. Check to make sure all of the parts are working the way they should.

Like any other tool or piece of equipment, your fishing reel needs consistent maintenance to continue to work well and remain durable. If you usually fish in freshwater, you should clean your reel at least once every five fishing trips, whereas saltwater fishers need to clean their reels after every trip.

Well, if you don’t have any fishing reel oil in hand, you can certainly use Vaseline. Vaseline mainly acts as a grease. So it won’t reach the smallest part of the reel. But you can keep the parts lubed which are reachable.

You should actually have a different reel oil for those, not the same one as for bearings and other parts, if you want to ensure maximum performance. So, yes, the gun oil may be used on reels, however, it is not the most optimal option. But, it is much better to use that one, than not using oil at all.

I personally recommend White Lithium Grease but not out of an aerosol can. Lithium Grease out of an aerosol can will also have an acetone in them and may damage your fishing reel. White Lithium Grease from a tube does not contain an aerosol or acetone.

This is most often caused by one of these 3 problems: Braid slipping on spinning reel spool; Spinning reel locked up; Line not under bail arm.

Pinch the cast bail on spinning reels (open-faced reels where the spool is exposed) and release the two ends out of the cast bail housing. Look for any bends in the bail. If no bends are present, pinch the bail again and place it back into the housing to ensure it is not askew. Test the reel in function.

  1. Prepare Your Workspace: Set up your workspace in a well-lit area. Lay a clean cloth on a steady, even surface over which you can work on your reel.
  2. Clean and Oil the Bail: Open the bail, apply cleaning solvent to the bail connection points and line roller. Lightly scrub with bristle brush and wipe dry, and apply a few drops of reel oil to the bail connection points. Open and close the bail several times to work in the oil.
  3. Clean and Oil the Spool:Unscrew and remove drag knob, then remove the spool from the reel body, and apply cleaning solvent to drag knob, insides of the spool and exposed areas. Wipe to remove dirt, debris or excess oil. Use cotton swabs to remove grime from crevices, and apply a few drops of reel oil to main shaft and gears.To reassemble, place the spool back on the reel body and reattach drag knob.
  4. Oil the Bearings in Reel Body: Remove the screw cap on the reel body. Unscrew the reel handle and remove, and use a cotton swab to wipe down the bearings and remove dirt or old lubricant.Apply one drop of reel oil to each bearing and to joints on handle, reassemble handle and screw cap.
  5. Oil the Reel Body: Once finished, wipe down the entire reel lightly with reel oil. This will add a layer of protection and help bead off water during use.

Salt accelerates the rusting process of metal components and can consequently reduce the performance and life span of your reels. Dirt, fish blood and guts, and sand particles can also get into the inner parts of the reels and eventually cause damage.

This feature is typically located at the bottom of the reel and can be a helpful tool when fighting fish. This switch allows you to backreel, or reel in reverse, rather than relying on your drag system for line tension.

Only option I’ve found is to soak the reels in alcohol then re-oil and grease everything once it’s dry.

Saltwater reels are designed with special castings to resist saltwater corrosion. The main difference between saltwater and freshwater gear is the ability of saltwater gear to withstand the corrosive environment it is subjected to. Saltwater is a harsh liquid and it has the ability to corrode solid metal structures.

I would probably take the reel apart and take just the parts with verdigris (which is the green corrosion you see), and soak them in a solution of straight simple green or a mix of about 3:2 of simple green. Then after letting it soak over night if it doesnt sluff right off a toothbrush would probably get the rest.

Some people recommend soaking for the cleaning process. The idea is that it promotes deep cleaning. We’re going to not recommend that here. The more you soak a fishing reel, the greater the chance is going to get into your gear system.

The whole fishing reel oil debate reminds me so much of my former lives as a bicycle mechanic and a downhill longboarder and the staggering selection of lubricants on the market.

Obviously, there’s some differences in applications, but I think all fundamentals of geartrain lubricants are similar.

Heavy lubes will stick better to gears, etc, and generally are good for overall water repellency. The downside though, especially in a bike chain application, is that while it’ll stay on, it’ll also pick up enough grime and grit to make a street sweeper jealous, which overall will increase wear. I don’t know applicable the dirt–>wear issue would be for fishing reels though. The increased viscosity also may have noticeable effects on bearing freespin. Not a huge issue in longboard wheels, despite the notion that insane freespin = insane performance (I always opted for thicker stuff in my bearings in an attempt to keep water and grime out), but might show up in something like spinning reels if you like to give the handle a kick and let it spin itself out.

The way I look at it, in general, the more precise the operation, the finer the lubricant. On bikes with unsealed wheel hub bearings, we’d pack them with whatever can of grease was open in the back of the shop. Iron age technology = Iron age lubrication. I’ll avoid using chain lube analogies as the applications are totally different. However, on “precision” gears, such as in shifters, etc, I liked to use light greases of unknown composition. For super-precision applications, such as cartridge bearings, cable housings, derailleur linkages, I liked to use the thinnest teflon-based, non-wax bearing lubricant I could get my hands on.

 

Whatever you do, don’t use 3-in-1, I’m still not sure what it is other than a huge gunky mess that has no place outside industrial-type operation. And for the love of God, don’t use WD-40 on anything that you ever care about being remotely clean. The bike business taught me that WD-40 is like a hammer: it’s a repair tool, not something you’d use in regular maintenance. A classic example would be a squeaky door hinge. The hinge, under ideal circumstances, shouldn’t squeak, but WD-40 is decent for fixing it.

max drag is the maximum force that a reel is designed to safely operate at. Line weight is a recomended range to safely use on a rod. The only one of these that is a set breaking point is the line so if reel is chosen with a maximum drag below this figure the line will not break even at max drag.

Many anglers ask do I need to oil my fishing reel? Yes, you definitely should. Some models should even be oiled after you buy them, before the first use, because sometimes reels come with insufficient amount of oil. Reels are made from many parts, and the most important ones are the moving ones.

Baitcasting reels are great when it comes to chasing both freshwater and saltwater species of fish. Lightning-fast and powerful, this type of fishing reels is manufactured by a number of companies like Shimano, Abu Garcia, Penn, and Daiwa. Depending on your reel model’s specifics and price level, it may remain sturdy and faultless for months; however, even the best baitcasting reels will require maintenance or repair occasionally as their spool slows down and wears due to common use.

DISASSEMBLING THE BAITCASTER

Carefully go through the following stages:

  • Wipe the spool’s outsides with a linen cloth to remove any dirt or debris. Use a small amount of soapy water if necessary to dissolve and remove stubborn stains. Various debris like pond scum and algae get inside the reel as they are brought in by the fishing line. The overall performance of the reel decreases with excessive dirt buildup.
  • Access the spool of your baitcaster by opening or releasing the slide or side panel. This will disengage the spool fixing mechanism and allow you to remove it. Examine the part for damage, such as nicks, cracks, and extreme wear. Use manufacturer’s parts to replace it.
  • Examine the gears and all the accessible moving parts related to the spool’s operation. Get rid of any visible debris with a soft brush, and apply a small amount of oil to the undamaged parts (look below for oiling instructions).
  • Take off the handle(s) for inspection and cleaning. As a rule, the handle(s) unscrews in reverse from the usual direction of rotation. Clean and lubricate the handle slot. Bear in mind that some reels have a very tight assembly to prevent water and moisture from entering the reel body.
  • You can access the insides by removing the small screws that hold the access plates in place. A small blade or screwdriver will usually do. Remove the old oil or grease from the internal gears with a cotton swab and inspect the parts for damage. Apply a few drops of oil and reassemble the reel.

OILING THE BAITCASTER

Simply put, the parts that require regular oiling are:

  • The bearings that help the spool rotate (you might use 3-in-1 oil for these);
  • The spool’s axis, in the place where it rotates inside the drive pinion;
  • The metal disc of the friction brake (marine grease is great for this and the above one);
  • The level wind (if you have one), non-spool bearings and sliding parts (these might do with 80-140 gear oil).

A baitcasting reel’s bearings and axes undergo a great deal of strain when the reel reaches its highest speed, and that is tens of thousands of revolutions per minute. Moreover, this comes in bursts after a period of a relatively relaxed performance. At these conditions, the least amount of friction becomes a handicap in terms of performance and subjects your reel’s mechanism to the risk of accelerated wear. Hence the need to lubricate.

However, you don’t want to over-lubricate, too; this would create a tension in the bearings, affecting their performance most negatively. What’s even worse, the excess oil will spread within the reel as the centrifugal force drives it out of the bearings. The correct approach, therefore, is to add less oil but do this more often, at least where it comes to the fast-rotating parts – the others can do with fewer maintenance sessions.

TIPS AND WARNINGS

  • Do not apply extra force if some parts don’t come loose – try spraying in some WD-40 first.
  • Check the official manual and disassembly instructions if your reel gives you a hard time.
  • Inspecting the spool can also help determine serious problems that require professional maintenance.
  • Be careful when cleaning and lubricating, avoid prolonged contact of grease/oil with the hands and keep it away from your eyes.

How Many Ball Bearings Minimum on a Fishing Reel? Most quality reels will have at least four ball bearings, which allows the balls to separate within the races equally and provide some level of friction control. You may notice that some reels are advertised as 4+1 or 5+1.

Apply a drop of oil at the base of each paddle on the handle and turn the paddle a few times to spread it out. Place the handle back on the shaft and tighten the nut with the wrench. Before re-attaching the C-clip, check the alignment of the handle nut cap. Once again, very carefully, pop the C-clip back onto the post.

Pinch the cast bail on spinning reels (open-faced reels where the spool is exposed) and release the two ends out of the cast bail housing. Look for any bends in the bail. If no bends are present, pinch the bail again and place it back into the housing to ensure it is not askew. Test the reel in function.